Post Reports

Post Reports

The Washington Post

Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post, for your ears. Martine Powers and Elahe Izadi are your hosts, asking the questions you didn’t know you wanted answered. Published weekdays around 5 p.m. Eastern time.

All Episodes

Kamala Harris, Democrats' heir apparent

Kamala Harris, Democrats' heir apparent

🄴 Post Reports

Yesterday, President Biden announced that he would no longer be running for reelection; he also endorsed Vice President Harris to replace him as the Democratic nominee for president in November’s election. Over the past 24 hours, endorsements of Harris have been rolling in from top Democrats. Today on Post Reports, host Elahe Izadi speaks with The Washington Post’s White House bureau chief, Toluse Olorunnipa, about Biden’s decision to endorse Harris. Plus, host Martine Powers and White House reporter Cleve Wootson dive deep into Harris’s career and how she’s evolved as a politician over the years.Today’s show was produced by Emma Talkoff and Trinity Webster-Bass. It was mixed by Sam Bair and edited by Reena Flores, with help from Ariel Plotnick. Subscribe to The Washington Post here.

President Biden steps aside

President Biden steps aside

🄴 Post Reports

On Sunday afternoon, President Biden released a statement announcing that he would stand down from seeking reelection in the 2024 presidential race. The statement came after weeks of mounting pressure from members of his party, many of whom expressed concern over his health and speculated whether he would be able to beat former president Donald Trump. Host Elahe Izadi speaks with White House reporter Tyler Pager about this monumental decision by the president and whether it puts Democrats in a better position to beat Trump. Today’s show was produced by Ariel Plotnick and Sabby Robinson. It was edited by Reena Flores and mixed by Sean Carter. Subscribe to The Washington Post here.

Deep Reads: Can a civics teacher persuade her students to believe in democracy?

Deep Reads: Can a civics teacher persuade her students to believe in democracy?

🄴 Post Reports

So far, polling suggests that young voter turnout in 2024 may not match 2020’s rate. In April, only 41 percent of Black people 18 to 39 told a Washington Post-Ipsos poll that they were certain to vote this year, down from 61 percent in June 2020.The poll mirrored what Shannon Salter was seeing among her civics students, whose interest in voting had been hobbled by poverty, racism and two aging presidential candidates seemingly far removed from the world of a struggling Allentown, Pa., teen.To these students, American politics was an ego-driven, aimless mess. She had more than a month to go before the end of the term to convince her students that their participation in American democracy was worth it. She had no idea how hard a sell that would turn out to be.This story is part of our Deep Reads series, which showcases narrative journalism at The Washington Post. It was written and read by Greg Jaffe. Audio narration comes from our partners at Noa, an app offering curated audio articles.

The Campaign Moment: Trump's convention, Biden's crisis

The Campaign Moment: Trump's convention, Biden's crisis

🄴 Post Reports

Democrats flipped the typical convention script this week, dominating the news during the Republican National Convention in Milwaukee. Following the attempted assassination of former president Donald Trump at a rally Saturday, the GOP aimed to send a message of unity to the party faithful. In his acceptance speech, Trump initially seemed somber, telling the crowd, “I’m not supposed to be here tonight.” They chanted back, “Yes, you are.” But he quickly regained his normal campaign posture, hammering Democrats over immigration and the economy. Meanwhile, new reporting from The Post shows that Biden is hearing concerns about his fitness to lead the ticket from senior Democratic figures like former House speaker Nancy Pelosi and former president Barack Obama.Martine Powers and Aaron Blake, senior political reporter and writer of The Campaign Moment newsletter, speak with Dan Balz, the chief correspondent covering national politics, the presidency and Congress at The Post.Today’s show was produced by Laura Benshoff and Charla Freeland. It was edited by Reena Flores and Lucy Perkins and mixed by Sam Bair. Subscribe to The Campaign Moment newsletter here.Subscribe to The Washington Post here.

How the 1984 Olympics saved the Games

How the 1984 Olympics saved the Games

🄴 Post Reports

In the early 1980s, the Olympic Games were on the verge of dying out. After a string of disasters, the Games had become unaffordable, politically fraught, and faced serious security concerns. Then came the spectacular 1984 Summer Games in Los Angeles that reinvented the way the Olympics were run.Guest host Ted Muldoon sits down with Les Carpenter, who covers the Olympics for The Post. They break down what changed in the 1984 Games and explore if 2024 could be another turning point.Today’s show was produced and mixed by Ted Muldoon. It was edited by Renita Jablonski. Thanks to Matt Rennie. Audio of the 1984 Olympic events courtesy of the ABC Sports Collection, managed by ESPN. Additional audio courtesy of AT&T Archives and History Center, RunnerSpace.com and Rocky Mountain PBS.Subscribe to The Washington Post here.