Post Reports

Post Reports

The Washington Post

Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post, for your ears. Martine Powers and Elahe Izadi are your hosts, asking the questions you didn’t know you wanted answered. Published weekdays around 5 p.m. Eastern time.

All Episodes

Day 1 of Trump's first criminal trial

Day 1 of Trump's first criminal trial

🄴 Post Reports

Today on Post Reports, we’re on the scene at the Manhattan courthouse where Donald Trump is facing trial in the first ever criminal prosecution of a former U.S. president.  Read more:Jury selection began today in the trial to determine whether Trump broke state law in New York by falsifying business records to cover up a hush money payment in 2016 to keep adult film actress Stormy Daniels quiet about their alleged affair. Isaac Arnsdorf and Shayna Jacobs are at the courthouse and tell Martine Powers what they’ve seen so far.  Today’s episode was produced by Peter Bresnan and Ted Muldoon, who also mixed the show. It was edited by Lucy Perkins.

The Campaign Moment: It’s 1864 in Arizona

The Campaign Moment: It’s 1864 in Arizona

🄴 Post Reports

It’s Friday, so it’s time for The Campaign Moment — our weekly roundtable conversation to help you keep track of the biggest developments during the 2024 campaign. Senior political reporter Aaron Blake, the author of The Post’s newsletter by the same name, chats with Martine Powers and our Arizona-based democracy reporter, Yvonne Wingett Sanchez, about the Arizona abortion ruling threatening to upend the 2024 election. The Arizona Supreme Court this week ruled that a near-total abortion ban from 1864 can go into effect in the state. It’s a big test for Donald Trump, who has taken credit for overturning Roe v. Wade but said that Arizona went too far and that state lawmakers would quickly “bring it back into reason.”Yvonne, Martine and Aaron also chat about an awkward moment for RFK Jr.’s campaign, and how the N.Y. hush money trial could play for Trump in swing states like Arizona. Follow The Campaign Moment in a new feed to hear extra episodes from Aaron and our politics team as the campaign year continues on Apple, Spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts. Subscribe to Aaron’s newsletter, The Campaign Moment, here. Subscribe to The Washington Post here.Today’s show was produced and mixed by Ted Muldoon. It was edited by Maggie Penman.

How will O.J. Simpson be remembered?

How will O.J. Simpson be remembered?

🄴 Post Reports

O.J. Simpson has died at 76. He became a a football star, but a 1995 murder trial made him infamous. Simpson was eventually acquitted of the murder of his ex-wife and her friend – a verdict that split the public. How will he be remembered?Read more:Simpson grew up in a poor neighborhood in San Francisco, and eventually rose to NFL stardom playing for the Buffalo Bills and later the San Francisco 49ers. He was one of the most well- known and well-liked personalities off the field, too, and was a sports commentator and appeared in more than 20 movies.But his private life was much darker. During his marriage to Nicole Brown Simpson, his wife repeatedly called 911 asking for protection. In one incident, police found her with bruises, a cut lip and a black eye, saying, “He’s going to kill me, he’s going to kill me.”In the mid-1990s, the country watched as Simpson stood trial for the murder of his then ex-wife and a friend. He was ultimately acquitted. Simpson died of cancer on Wednesday. Today on “Post Reports,” we talk to Robin Givhan, The Post’s senior critic-at-large, about why the trial had legal and cultural repercussions for years. Today’s show was produced and mixed by Ted Muldoon with help from Emma Talkoff, Rennie Svirnovskiy, Elana Gordon and Maggie Penman. It was edited by Monica Campbell and Lucy Perkins. Additional thanks to Krissah Thompson.Subscribe to The Washington Post here.

The mounting allegations against Sean ‘Diddy’ Combs

The mounting allegations against Sean ‘Diddy’ Combs

🄴 Post Reports

For decades, hip-hop mogul Sean “Diddy” Combs has been a music powerhouse. He’s now subject to lawsuits alleging abuse, sexual violence and sex trafficking. Today, what we know about the allegations and the ripples in the music industry.Read more:Late last month, armored trucks, helicopters and swarms of federal agents descended on two homes owned by Sean “Diddy” Combs in Los Angeles and Miami. The searches were part of an ongoing investigation into Combs by the Department of Homeland Security. He is now the focus of six lawsuits alleging physical violence, sexual abuse and sex trafficking stretching back to the beginning of Combs’s career in the early ’90s. The artist and producer – who has also been known onstage as Puff Daddy, Puffy and P. Diddy – has denied all allegations against him. The lawsuits claim that many people in Combs’s circle helped facilitate his abusive behavior, implicating a web of high-profile names in the music industry.Anne Branigin has been watching the investigation unfold. She says the allegations could lead to a larger reckoning about misogyny, violence and the exploitation of women in the music industry.Today’s show was produced by Sabby Robinson with help from Emma Talkoff. It was mixed by Sean Carter and edited by Lucy Perkins. 

Help! I haven’t filed my taxes yet!

Help! I haven’t filed my taxes yet!

🄴 Post Reports

The tax filing deadline is less than a week away. Personal finance columnist Michelle Singletary answers your last-minute tax questions and offers advice on what to do if you need more time to file.Read more:The deadline for most taxpayers to file a federal tax return is Monday, April 15. If you haven’t filed yet or have some lingering questions about the 2024 tax season, don’t panic. Personal finance columnist Michelle Singletary is here to put your mind at ease and help make sure you don’t end up in hot water with the IRS.You don’t have to feel intimidated by tax season and the IRS. There are things you can do to make filing easier. If needed, you can file for an extension or enlist the help of a trusted tax professional for some of those tricker circumstances.Today’s show was produced by Charla Freeland. It was mixed by Sean Carter. It was edited by Maggie Penman with help from Ted Muldoon. Subscribe to The Washington Post here.