Post Reports

Post Reports

The Washington Post

Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post, for your ears. Martine Powers and Elahe Izadi are your hosts, asking the questions you didn’t know you wanted answered. Published weekdays around 5 p.m. Eastern time.

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How to reset your relationship with exercise at any age

How to reset your relationship with exercise at any age

🄴 Post Reports

Exercising can be intimidating. Any New Year’s resolutions you made might feel overly ambitious and hard to keep. But fitness science tells us that exercise is linked to longevity and staying young. Read more: How fit you are is not determined by your age, weight or ability to do any one physical activity. In this bonus episode of Post Reports, we’ll talk about how to stay fit at any age. Health columnist Gretchen Reynolds shares some simple exercises to assess your fitness and explains how overall fitness influences how long and how well we live. This is part of our occasional series about how we can all rethink and reset our daily habits in 2024. You can find the online fitness age calculator here.This episode was produced by Taylor White and Bishop Sand. It was mixed by Sean Carter. It was edited by Lucy Perkins. 

The Campaign Moment: Trump VP chatter, the Biden impeachment inquiry and more

The Campaign Moment: Trump VP chatter, the Biden impeachment inquiry and more

🄴 Post Reports

It’s Friday, so it’s time for “The Campaign Moment” – a new weekly roundtable conversation to help you keep track of the biggest political news in this campaign year. Senior political reporter Aaron Blake, who writes The Post’s new newsletter by the same name, and senior national political correspondent Ashley Parker sit down with Martine Powers to discuss the expectations for this weekend’s South Carolina Republican presidential primary, the chatter on who is on former president Donald Trump’s list of potential running mates and the latest in the Republican House-led impeachment inquiry of President Biden. Subscribe to Aaron’s newsletter, The Campaign Moment, here. Subscribe to The Washington Post here.Today’s show was produced and mixed by Ted Muldoon. It was edited by Renita Jablonski. 

The fragile future of IVF in Alabama

The fragile future of IVF in Alabama

🄴 Post Reports

On Friday, the Alabama Supreme Court ruled that frozen embryos are legally people and that someone can be held liable for destroying them. Today on “Post Reports,” how the first-of-its-kind ruling has complicated women’s health care in the state and its implications across the country. Read more:In Alabama, doctors and patients are scrambling to understand the implications of a recent state supreme court decision that ruled frozen embryos are legally people. A number of in-vitro fertilization (IVF) clinics in the state have paused their services in light of the court’s decision. The ruling has the potential to impact hundreds of thousands of people across the state who depend on IVF treatments. The White House decried the ruling, and legal experts have warned that it could empower the “personhood movement,” which asserts unborn children should be granted legal rights starting at conception. National health reporter Sabrina Malhi joins “Post Reports” to break down the ruling, what the immediate effect has been, and what precedent this ruling sets in the ongoing battle over women’s reproductive rights. In other news: We’re six weeks away from the total solar eclipse traversing North America on April 8. Check out The Post’s guide to find the best place for cloud-free eclipse viewing.  Today’s show was produced by Sabby Robinson with help from Peter Bresnan. It was mixed by Sean Carter. It was edited by Lucy Perkins. Subscribe to The Washington Post here.

Can Tesla’s Full Self-Driving mode be trusted?

Can Tesla’s Full Self-Driving mode be trusted?

🄴 Post Reports

Today, as automakers race toward a driverless future, The Post’s technology reporter Trisha Thadani breaks down a Post investigation into a 2022 car crash in Colorado and the questions it raises about new self-driving technology on the road now. Read more:In May of 2022, Hans von Ohain and his friend Erik Rossiter went golfing in Evergreen, Colo. Hans showed off his Tesla’s new Full Self-Driving mode. The friends shared drinks and played 21 holes of golf.But Hans never made it home. On the drive back along a curvy mountain road, Hans and his Tesla swerved into a tree and burst into flames. Erik survived. Hans died in the fire. When Post technology reporter Trisha Thadani learned of the accident, it surprised her. First, if Full Self-Driving mode was engaged when the car crashed, it would be the first confirmed fatality connected to the technology. Then she discovered that Hans was a Tesla employee.Today on “Post Reports,” Trisha breaks down what she and a team of reporters learned about the moments leading up to the fatal crash and the bigger conversation about safety regulations on autonomous driving technology.Today’s show was produced by Emma Talkoff. It was edited by Monica Campbell and mixed by Sean Carter. Thanks to Maggie Penman. The reporters who Trisha Thadani worked with on the Tesla investigation include Faiz Siddiqui, Rachel Lerman, Julia Wall and Whitney Shefte.  Subscribe to The Washington Post here.

Navalny’s legacy

Navalny’s legacy

🄴 Post Reports

The death of Vladimir Putin's largest opponent, Alexei Navalny, has rocked hopes of democracy in Russia. We speak with The Post's David M. Herszenhorn, who covered Navalny in Russia, about the impact of his death and Putin's tightening grip on power.Read more:Alexei Navalny had been a charismatic and outspoken critic of the Kremlin for more than a decade, and was the target of an assassination attempt. Last year, Navalny was sentenced to 19 years in prison on charges of “extremism,” but was seen alive and seemingly healthy just a few days before his death. President Biden condemned Navalny’s death as “proof of Putin’s brutality.” The Post’s David M. Herszenhorn has written extensively about Navalny’s career and activism. Herszenhorn joins Post Reports to talk about Navalny’s legacy, and what the Russian political landscape might look like without him. Today’s show was produced by Elana Gordon with help from Peter Bresnan. It was mixed by Sean Carter. It was edited by Lucy Perkins.Subscribe to The Washington Post here.