The Daily

The Daily

The New York Times

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro and Sabrina Tavernise. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

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The Death of Tyre Nichols

The Death of Tyre Nichols

🄴 The Daily

This episode contains descriptions of violence and strong language.Tyre Nichols was a 29-year-old Black man who lived in Memphis. His mother described him as living a simple and pleasant life. He worked for FedEx, loved to skateboard, was an amateur photographer and had a 4-year-old son.On the evening of Jan. 7, after a traffic stop, Mr. Nichols was violently beaten by the police, sustaining severe injuries. He died on Jan. 10.For weeks, what exactly had happened was unclear. This weekend, videos of the encounter were released.Guest: Rick Rojas, the Southern bureau chief for The New York Times.Background reading: The five officers charged with the murder of Tyre Nichols are also Black, complicating the anguish and efforts to change the police.Recently released video footage included critical moments in which police officers kicked, punched and pepper-sprayed Mr. Nichols while he screamed.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

The Sunday Read: ‘Has the Amazon Reached Its “Tipping Point”?’

The Sunday Read: ‘Has the Amazon Reached Its “Tipping Point”?’

🄴 The Daily

In the past half-century, 17 percent of the Amazon — an area larger than Texas — has been converted to croplands or cattle pasture. Less forest means less recycled rain, less vapor to cool the air, less of a canopy to shield against sunlight. Under drier, hotter conditions, even the lushest of Amazonian trees will shed leaves to save water, inhibiting photosynthesis — a feedback loop that is only exacerbated by global warming.According to the Brazilian Earth system scientist Carlos Nobre, if deforestation reaches 20 to 25 percent of the original area, “flying rivers” — rain clouds that recycle the forest’s own moisture five or six times — will weaken enough that a rainforest simply will not be able to survive in most of the Amazon Basin. Instead it will collapse into scrubby savanna, possibly in a matter of decades.Losing the Amazon, one of the most biodiverse ecosystems on Earth, would be catastrophic for the tens of thousands of species that make their home there. What scientists are most concerned about, though, is the potential for this regional, ecological tipping point to produce knock-on effects in the global climate.This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

Arrests, Executions and the Iranian Protesters Who Refuse to Give Up

Arrests, Executions and the Iranian Protesters Who Refuse to Give Up

🄴 The Daily

This episode contains descriptions of violence and injury. In September, protests began in Iran over the death of a young woman, Mahsa Amini, at the hands of the government. The demonstrations have since intensified, as has the government’s response, with thousands arrested and a terrifying campaign of public executions underway.Today, Iranians who have taken part in the demonstrations tell us — in their own words — why they are willing to brave such severe punishments to help bring about change.Guest: Cora Engelbrecht, an international reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: The protests in Iran have escalated amid anger over religious rules and a rock-bottom economy.A look at the Iranians who have been hanged, and those on death row, as the government tries to crush the monthslong uprising.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

An Aggressive New Approach to Childhood Obesity

An Aggressive New Approach to Childhood Obesity

🄴 The Daily

Recent advice from the American Academy of Pediatrics has recommended a bold approach to treating the millions of children in the United States who are affected by obesity. Counseling, drug treatment and even surgery should be considered, the group says.The guidelines are a response to a deeper understanding of what obesity is — and what to do about it.Guest: Gina Kolata, a medical reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: The new guidelines have underscored how complicated childhood obesity is for patients and health providers.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

How Nonprofit Hospitals Put Profits Over Patients

How Nonprofit Hospitals Put Profits Over Patients

🄴 The Daily

Nonprofit hospitals — which make up around half of hospitals in the United States — were founded to help the poor.But a Times investigation has revealed that many have deviated from those charitable roots, behaving like for-profit companies, sometimes to the detriment of the health of patients.Guest: Jessica Silver-Greenberg, an investigative business reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: With the help of a consulting firm, the Providence hospital system trained staff members to wring money out of patients, even those eligible for free care.Dozens of doctors have said that this New York nonprofit hospital pressured them to give preferential treatment to donors, trustees and their families.Bon Secours Mercy Health, a major nonprofit health system, used a poor neighborhood to tap into a lucrative federal drug program.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.